experience


experience
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin experientia act of trying, from experient-, experiens, present participle of experiri to try, from ex- + -periri (akin to periculum attempt) — more at fear Date: 14th century 1. a. direct observation of or participation in events as a basis of knowledge b. the fact or state of having been affected by or gained knowledge through direct observation or participation 2. a. practical knowledge, skill, or practice derived from direct observation of or participation in events or in a particular activity b. the length of such participation <
has 10 years' experience in the job
>
3. a. the conscious events that make up an individual life b. the events that make up the conscious past of a community or nation or humankind generally 4. something personally encountered, undergone, or lived through 5. the act or process of directly perceiving events or reality II. transitive verb (-enced; -encing) Date: 1580 1. to learn by experience <
I have experienced that a landscape and the sky unfold the deepest beauty — Nathaniel Hawthorne
>
2. to have experience of ; undergo <
experienced severe hardships as a child
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms: