process


process
I. noun (plural processes) Etymology: Middle English proces, from Anglo-French procés, from Latin processus, from procedere Date: 14th century 1. a. progress, advance <
in the process of time
>
b. something going on ; proceeding 2. a. (1) a natural phenomenon marked by gradual changes that lead toward a particular result <
the process of growth
>
(2) a continuing natural or biological activity or function <
such life processes as breathing
>
b. a series of actions or operations conducing to an end; especially a continuous operation or treatment especially in manufacture 3. a. the whole course of proceedings in a legal action b. the summons, mandate, or writ used by a court to compel the appearance of the defendant in a legal action or compliance with its orders 4. a prominent or projecting part of an organism or organic structure <
a bone process
>
<
a nerve cell process
>
5. conk VI II. transitive verb Date: 1532 1. a. to proceed against by law ; prosecute b. (1) to take out a summons against (2) to serve a summons on 2. a. to subject to a special process or treatment (as in the course of manufacture or film development) b. (1) to subject to or handle through an established usually routine set of procedures <
process insurance claims
>
(2) to integrate sensory information received so that an action or response is generated <
the brain processes visual images relayed from the retina
>
(3) to subject to examination or analysis <
computers process data
>
c. to work (hair) into a conk III. adjective Date: 1888 1. treated or made by a special process especially when involving synthesis or artificial modification 2. made by or used in a mechanical or photomechanical duplicating process 3. of or involving illusory effects usually introduced during processing of the film IV. intransitive verb Etymology: back-formation from 1procession Date: 1814 chiefly British to move in a procession

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms: