suit


suit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sute, seute pursuit, retinue, set, legal action, from Anglo-French siute, suite, from Vulgar Latin *sequita, from feminine of *sequitus, past participle of *sequere to follow — more at sue Date: 14th century 1. archaic suite 1 2. a. recourse or appeal to a feudal superior for justice or redress b. an action or process in a court for the recovery of a right or claim 3. an act or instance of suing or seeking by entreaty ; appeal; specifically courtship 4. a group of things forming a unit ; suite — used chiefly of armor, sails, and counters in games 5. a set of garments: as a. an ensemble of two or more usually matching outer garments (as a jacket, vest, and trousers) <
businessmen wearing three-piece suits
>
b. a costume to be worn for a special purpose or under particular conditions <
gym suits
>
6. a. all the playing cards in a pack bearing the same symbol b. all the dominoes bearing the same number c. all the cards or counters in a particular suit held by one player <
a 5-card suit
>
d. the suit led <
follow suit
>
7. slang a business executive — usually used in plural • suited adjective II. verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to be becoming to <
that dress suits you
>
b. to be proper for ; befit <
a mood that suits the occasion
>
2. to outfit with clothes ; dress 3. accommodate, adapt <
suit the action to the word
>
4. to meet the needs or desires of ; please <
suits me fine
>
intransitive verb 1. to be in accordance ; agree <
the position suits with your abilities
>
2. to be appropriate or satisfactory <
these prices don't suit
>
3. to put on specially required clothing (as a uniform or protective garb) — usually used with up <
players suiting up for the game
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms: